Criminal Justice

It is well documented that the United States incarcerates a larger percentage of its citizens than any other country. This statistic weighs heavily not only on the public conscience of the nation, but also the pocketbooks of state taxpayers burdened by the price of an overcrowded prison system. The “tough on crime” mentality that dominated the 1990s is losing favor across the political spectrum, especially as rehabilitative support services show promising results and the role of mental illness in criminal behavior is explored more thoroughly. Many young legislators are leading their states in addressing prison overcrowding, police brutality, and the incarceration of nonviolent drug offenders with comprehensive and bipartisan legislation. Their advancement of innovative training tactics, community support, and rehabilitation demonstrates admirable commitment to both safety and justice.  

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June 2017: Louisiana Future Caucus co-chair Rep. Ted James (D) championed HB 277, which required police to undergo comprehensive training that includes de-escalation, bias recognition, in-custody death, and mental illness. It was passed  along with a suite of other bipartisan criminal justice reforms.

 

June 2017: Louisiana Future Caucus co-chairs Rep. Ted James (D) and Rep. Tanner Magee (R) co-sponsored a bill that would “ban the box” on college applications in Louisiana. This bill also passed as part of the sweeping criminal justice reform and opens the door to higher education for formerly incarcerated individuals.

 

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May 2017: Next Generation Nebraska co-chair Sen. Adam Morfeld (D) sponsored LB 487. This bill extended liability protections to first responders and healthcare professionals who administer emergency medication including naloxone. It also exempted those witnessing or suffering from drug overdoses from criminal prosecution.

 

March 2017: Illinois Future Caucus co-chair Rep. Will Guzzardi (D) joined a bipartisan group of sponsors of the Neighborhood Safety Act. The bill increased access to training programs for probation officers, comprehensive trauma recovery services for violent crime victims and opportunities for probation. 

 

June 2015: In Texas, former Young Texans Legislative Caucus co-chair Rep. Eric Johnson (D) joined a bipartisan group of legislators in sponsoring SB 158, which establishes policies for the state body-worn camera program and allows for the Department of Public Safety to apply for a grant to implement the program.


This is a sampling of legislation advanced by State Future Caucus members and other young legislators around the country. To inquire about legislation in other policy areas, or to suggest your own legislation for MAP to feature, please contact policy@millennialaction.org

MAP is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and does not engage in any lobbying activities or attempt to influence legislation.

Education and the Workforce

Millennials consistently rank their future or continued employment as a primary concern. Preparation for future work--and for the future of work--is a pressing issue for the next generation. This preparation comes in a variety of ways--for some, it means investing in higher education that is growing increasingly unaffordable. For others, it requires high-quality technical education and apprenticeship programs that match entry-level workers with employers.  Both of these endeavors require a deep understanding of the modern economy and its demands, as well as state-level investment in the training of its workforce. Young lawmakers, many of whom have struggled with theses issues firsthand, are taking steps to update public education, state workforce development, and student loan programs to align more closely with present-day skill requirements.

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November 2017: In Illinois, Future Caucus Co-Chair Rep. Will Guzzardi (D) and several colleagues sponsored SB1351. This bill, signed in 2017, is an attempt to prevent borrowers from being misled or ignored by the companies that service their loans.

 

September 2016: In California,  Assemblyman Matt Dababneh (D) and several colleagues co-sponsored AB 2251. This bill, signed in 2016, imposes new regulations and duties on student loan servicers to provide more information to borrowers.

 

 

August 2016: Pennsylvania Future Caucus co-chairs Reps. Nick Miccarelli (R) and Kevin Boyle (D) introduced HB 2305, proposing a five-year tuition freeze on state system universities and colleges. While the legislation died in committee, it demonstrated the Caucus’ commitment to affordable higher education.

 

 

June 2015: In Colorado, Future Caucus co-chair Rep. Dan Pabon (D) joined two Republicans in sponsoring HB 1366. This legislation provides an income tax credit for businesses entering in job growth partnerships with higher education institutions.

 


This is a sampling of legislation advanced by State Future Caucus members and other young legislators around the country. To inquire about legislation in other policy areas, or to suggest your own legislation for MAP to feature, please contact policy@millennialaction.org.

MAP is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and does not engage in any lobbying activities or attempt to influence legislation.

Energy and the Environment

As national environmental policy shifts under a new administration, states are seizing the opportunity to develop sustainable and innovative energy policies. Lawmakers have identified the opportunity to create green jobs and spur private investment while ensuring that the energy needs of the next generation will be met. Young legislators have been at the forefront of adapting government programs and investments to support emerging energy enterprises. As states begin to make their own commitments to reducing emissions and investing in renewable energy, Future Caucus members have recognized the value of investing in alternative energy sources and demonstrated the potential for bipartisan action in this policy area.

September 2016: In California, former Future Caucus co-chairs Asm. Evan Low (D) and Asm. Ling Ling Chang (R) supported AB 1637. This bill aimed to double available funds for the Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP), which provides rebates for small-scale distributed alternative energy resources and storage. 

 

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June 2016: Hawaii Future Caucus co-chairs Rep. Beth Fukumoto (R) and Rep. Takashi Ohno (D) co-sponsored HB 2231. This bill allowed publicly owned energy cooperatives to receive special revenue bonds, which are intended to finance capital investments that serve the public interest.   

 

June 2015: Texas Rep. Chris Paddie (D), a former Future Caucus co-chair, worked with Reps. Anchia (D), Villalba (R), and Eltife (R) to pass HB 1184. This bill, signed in June of 2015, made certain alternative fuel and utility cost savings programs eligible for local government energy savings performance contracts. These contracts enable local entities to finance energy-saving projects with no up-front investment and instead pay for the improvements with annual utility savings generated by the project.

 

May 2015: Colorado Future Caucus co-chair Rep. Dan Pabon (D) teamed up with Rep. Larry Crowder (R) to sponsor HB 15-1332, which established a new state income tax credit. This credit rewards taxpayers who purchase and install equipment for generating hydroelectricity, wind power, or biomass fuel with up to 30% of their total cost or $50,000.


This is a sampling of legislation advanced by State Future Caucus members and other young legislators around the country. To inquire about legislation in other policy areas, or to suggest your own legislation for MAP to feature, please contact policy@millennialaction.org.

MAP is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and does not engage in any lobbying activities or attempt to influence legislation.

Good Government

Millennials have low confidence in our political system, but state legislators around the country are fighting to make that system more accountable, transparent, and functional. States are working to draw fairer districts and make it easier for all citizens--millennials included--to register and get to the polls. Young lawmakers are embracing the fundamentals of American democracy and reaching across party lines to preserve the country’s founding ideals. Beyond that, they are adjusting to a changing campaign finance landscape and leveraging new technologies for civic participation and government transparency.

June 2017: Colorado Rep. Dan Pabon (D), one of the Future Caucus co-chairs, sponsored SB 40. This legislation requires that public records be made available in searchable, sortable digital formats unless security or privacy restrictions prevent their dissemination. This bill takes government transparency into the digital age.

 

May 2017: Indiana Future Caucus Co-Chair Rep. Dave Ober (R) joined 13 other lawmakers from both sides of the aisle in sponsoring HB 1470. This bill established a state data officer and management performance hub charged with collecting, analyzing, and disseminating state agency data. 

 

September 2016: Ohio Future Caucus co-chair Sen. Frank LaRose (R) sponsored SB 63, which created a Statewide Voter Registration Database and secure online voter registration system. This allows Ohio citizens to easily register to vote and for voter records to be analyzed readily to remove ineligible persons. The bill passed both chambers almost-unanimously.

 

March 2014: The Hawaii Future Caucus, including Rep. Beth Fukumoto (R) and Rep. Takashi Ohno (D), introduced HR 136. This resolution directed the Office of Elections to increase early voting locations and to make the University of Hawaii’s campus a voting location to increase youth voter turnout.

 

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December 2012: Also in Ohio, Future Caucus co-chair Sen. Frank LaRose (R) sponsored SJR 5 in 2012, which proposed an amendment that passed with a majority of 71% on the 2015 ballot. This amendment created a seven-member Redistricting Commission and required that all ten-year district lines must be approved by Commission members of both parties. It also forbids district plans from favoring either political party.  

 

July 2005: Landmark bipartisan legislation passed in Connecticut in 2005 established the Citizens’ Elections Program, which will provide public financing to candidates for statewide office that agree to abide by disclosure and expenditure requirements.


This is a sampling of legislation advanced by State Future Caucus members and other young legislators around the country. To inquire about legislation in other policy areas, or to suggest your own legislation for MAP to feature, please contact policy@millennialaction.org.

MAP is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and does not engage in any lobbying activities or attempt to influence legislation.

Healthcare

The healthcare debate remains at the forefront of American politics at the national level. States are adapting to a changing health landscape while fighting to avail citizens of affordable and accessible health services. Here, lawmakers from both parties have been able to surmount the gridlock that dominates Congress and move towards consensus. Woven throughout the debate are concerns regarding the overprescription of opioids, the challenges of an aging population, and active promotion of healthy living. Affordable insurance options and preventative care is necessary to avoid more costly long-term health problems as the millennial population ages. Young politicians have come of age with the health care debate and grown frustrated by the controversy it has caused, catalyzing action at the state level in the best interest of their constituents.

August 2016: In Illinois, Future Caucus co-chair Rep. Will Guzzardi (D) joined 51 other bipartisan co-sponsors in passing SB 2746, which exempted feminine hygiene and incontinence products from existing taxes.

 

March 2014: In Ohio, Future Caucus co-chair Sen. Frank LaRose (R) sponsored SB 206, which implemented a wide range of Medicaid revisions and reforms. It directed the oversight body to prioritize employment when managing public benefits and allowed county commissioners to create county Healthier Buckeye councils.

 

March 2013: Also in Ohio, a contingent of 72 lawmakers succeeded in passing SB 301. This bill created new limits for prescribing opioids and established regulations for pain management clinics.


This is a sampling of legislation advanced by State Future Caucus members and other young legislators around the country. To inquire about legislation in other policy areas, or to suggest your own legislation for MAP to feature, please contact policy@millennialaction.org.

MAP is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and does not engage in any lobbying activities or attempt to influence legislation.

Technology and Entrepreneurship

The 21st Century economy has been defined by new ideas in the realms of business and technology, which have changed the ways in which companies make money, raise capital, and reach consumers. Taking risks on new ventures has helped to spur our economic recovery, and it has also led to new regulations and protections for consumers. State legislatures have been taking steps to support small businesses and entrepreneurs in order to create new jobs and markets. Meanwhile, larger companies have spread new employment opportunities throughout the country via the sharing economy. Younger lawmakers have the advantage in crafting legislation in the technology and entrepreneurship space, as they have grown up with many of these businesses and often use their services themselves.

July 2016: Illinois Future Caucus co-chair Rep. Will Guzzardi (D) co-sponsored the bipartisan and unanimous HB 4999, which prohibits employers from forcing employees to grant access to their social media accounts.  

 

October 2015: California Future Caucus former co-chairs Asm. Ling Ling Chang (R) and Asm. Evan Low (D) co-sponsored AB 229. This bill includes rideshares and short-term rentals in reimbursable expenses for state employees. Similar legislation was subsequently introduced in Congress by Congressional Future Caucus members Reps. Seth Moulton (D-MA), Will Hurd (R-TX), and Eric Swalwell (D-CA).

 

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June 2015: Also in Texas, former Young Texans Legislative Caucus co-chair Rep. Eric Johnson (D) sponsored the bipartisan HB 1629. This bill facilitated and expanded online crowdfunding for small businesses, also allowing them to receive capital from nonprofit community development institutions or nonprofits with federal grant distribution abilities.

 

April 2015: Colorado HB 1246, sponsored by Future Caucus co-chair Rep. Dan Pabon (D) and legislators from both sides of the aisle, made equity crowdfunding legal in the state. This allows Colorado residents to invest up to $5,000 in a business in exchange for equity, bypassing previous regulations that limited investing to accredited investors of a certain net worth.  

 

June 2014: Colorado Future Caucus co-chair Rep. Dan Pabon was a sponsor of the first ridesharing legislation in the country. The bipartisan SB 125 authorized companies like Lyft and Uber to operate in Colorado, provided that they obtain permits and carry liability insurance.


This is a sampling of legislation advanced by State Future Caucus members and other young legislators around the country. To inquire about legislation in other policy areas, or to suggest your own legislation for MAP to feature, please contact policy@millennialaction.org.

MAP is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit and does not engage in any lobbying activities or attempt to influence legislation.